Author Archive: David Ehrenberg

Investors like milestone funding as it makes clear how much money you will need and what you’re going to do with it (which inspires confidence that they will see a return on their investment). It also helps to keep you on track, and, because it keeps you from raising too much, it keeps your dilution as low as possible.

Some common startup myths have frequently been debunked, like how running your own company will give you freedom (yeah, right!) or how failure leads to future success (it could, but it’s certainly no golden ticket), and how all an entrepreneur needs is passion (who needs the ability to execute when you have passion, right?!).

Your executive summary is essentially the cover letter to your business plan: its goal is to get the reader to check out your business plan and, hopefully, to set up a meeting. Think of your executive summary as the halfway point between your elevator pitch and your business plan—you have about 2 pages (give or take) to communicate your value proposition and get you to the next stop on your startup journey.

As we find ourselves hurtling towards the end of the year, there are a number of things you should be staying on top of in order to best manage your company finances and position your small business for greater success in the new year.

In the very early-stages, your startup finance strategy may be pretty straightforward. You need to establish your accounting platform and systems, including accounts receivable and accounts payable. You are going to want to identify the best payroll and banking solution for your company. And you definitely want to give some thought to tax considerations.

Financial projections are essentially made-up numbers that have nothing to do with your real business—they’re just another hoop that you need to jump through to satisfy investors, right? Wrong!

You’ve identified a pain point. You’ve come up with a solution. You’ve thought through your offering—and it’s a winner. You’re ready for next steps. You’re ready to raise some funding.

Or are you?

Bottom line is that you’re in business to make money. If your customers aren’t paying you, that’s a serious cash flow problem. If they’re slow to pay, that’s a problem as well. While late invoices are fairly common for many businesses, that doesn’t mean you can’t fight it. The key is process.

Valuation. You know you need one. Annually. What you may not know is that it really does matter who performs your valuation. There are a lot of valuation companies out there, so I know many entrepreneurs are tempted to just shop around until they find the lowest price, but this is a mistake.

Honestly fundraising can oftentimes feel like you’re navigating a minefield: one false step and the money blows up! That’s why you need to be clear on what you’re looking for, where to look for it, and what you need to get it.